The Lubbock Centennial 1909-2009 - presented by The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
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Centennial Kick Off by Spotted The Lubbock Centennial Kick Off Celebration

 

 


A car hop delivers an order to a customer at a Hi-D-Ho.

Hi-D-Ho was the place to hang out

By Terry Greenberg
Avalanche-Journal Editor

Gerron
For Peggy Sue Gerron, it was the place Lubbock High School students could turn up their car radios and play rock 'n' roll loud.

For Bryan Edwards, in Gerron's LHS Class of '58, it was one end of a "cruising" loop teens would drive.

For another class of '58 grad, Kay Carmickle Kirkpatrick, it was the place to hang out ... and drink cherry lemonades.

For Shannon Hughes, it was his job, later his restaurant and still a big part of his life.

Hughes
The Hi-D-Ho on north University Avenue was the place for young people to hang out and grab a Hidy Burger with Hidy Sauce, Hidy Fries and a Coke.
It was also, said Edwards, one end of that loop.

"The Hi-D-Ho was a circular building and you'd drive all the way around it, go across College (now University), over to the Town & Country Shopping Center, drive through that to the Village Mill (another restaurant), drive around it and come out going east back into the Town & Country parking lot," he said.

Lubbock native and famed entertainer Mac Davis, back in town to kick off the city's Centennial celebration tonight, immortalized part of the loop in the song late '70s song "Me and Fat Boy Pruitt."|

Davis sang a few lines Friday, shortly after coming to town from Los Angeles.
A cigarette lighter from the Hi-D-Ho Drive-in.

I had a beat-up Oldsmobile,
He had a '50 Ford Coupe,
We used to meet at the Village Mill,
And entertain the troops,
He knew every joke in the world,
And I knew all the songs,
We left 'em laughing, boys and girls,
When me and Fat Boy were on."

"I didn't mention the Hi-D-Ho in the song, but I could have put it in there in a New York minute," said Davis.

For Hughes, talking about the Hi-D-Ho takes more than a minute.
He started working there as a purchasing agent in 1957 after working in the meat business.

The Hi-D-Ho, which had other locations in Lubbock and Amarillo, was owned by Dr. N.A. Cox, said Hughes.

"Dr. Cox said give the customer what they want. The sauce was so rich and bad for the teens' complexion, but they loved it," he said.

Hughes said the sauce was close to Thousand Island dressing, but when asked what else, he paused and said, "It's a secret."

Hughes said the Hi-D-Ho had its own slang for some menu items:

— "Draw One" was a Coke, because it was most popular.
— "Waco" was a Dr. Pepper, in honor of where it was created.
— "Bowl of red" was chili.

Cars line up outside a Lubbock Hi-D-Ho Dirve-in. The Hi-D-Hos were popular gathering places for many Lubbock teennagers during the 1950's and 1960's.


Hughes said Dr. Cox was killed in a car accident in 1967. He left in 1969 and the 1970 tornado caused a lot of damage to the restaurant.

Hughes stayed in the restaurant business, but years later revived the Hi-D-Ho in two locations when he found the name was no longer registered. He retired in 2005.

His Lubbock home is filled with Hi-D-Ho memorabilia.

He also teamed up with Buddy Holly's niece Sherry, writing words to a number of songs she recorded in the 1990s ... "Don't Say Hello; Say Hi-D-Ho," "Hi-D-Ho Picnic," "Hi-D-Ho Opry" and more.

 

The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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