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Lubbock gets around the clock protection

1925 Lubbock is now under twenty-four hour, efficient police protection every day and a telephone call to the office, phone number 695, will bring ready response any hour of the day or night, Chief T.E. May, head of the police department, stated yesterday. Eight men are now regularly employed on the local force. One works part time, while a ninth regular man will be added in the very near future.

Chief May has divided his force into two equal parts, one division serving at night and the other during the day time. The night men are J.O. Carnell, Wade Hardy, J.W. Taylor and J.H. Stracher. Day men are Chief May, John Lemond, Tom Cannon and Paul Hardy. Chief May is also available to the force at night should the occasion arise that necessitates his presence. Joe Wolffarth, who is all-time fireman and who lives in the quarters provided for him and his family in the City Hall, does night duty as desk sergeant.

Nine uniforms for the Lubbock force were ordered some time ago and are expected to arrive any day, Chief May says. All of the men will not be uniformed, however, as one or two will be retained as plain clothes men. It is the opinion of the commissioners and the chief that a plain clothes officer or two is essential to a city the size of Lubbock. The officers have been placed on regular beats and at night and day phone in every fifteen minutes to report to whoever is on duty at the desk.

Every detail is being watched by the police here now. When it became apparent that auto accessory thieves were plying their trades during meetings held at night, officers were ordered to watch the vehicles parked about the meeting places. Night services at the churches are also protected by the law. Since that ruling went into effect few reports of stolen auto accessories have been given to the officers.

According to Chief May, he is now getting the co-operation of the people of Lubbock who wish to see the laws upheld and that if the good people of the city will stand behind him he will render the sort of police service that the city needs. There can be no leniency shown to law violators, no matter who they are or with what they are charged, the chief says, for if one person is let off every other one has a right to be.

In the enforcement of the traffic laws, particularly, Chief May urges the citizenship to co-operate with him.

Tuesday night a man from a nearby city was arrested and resisted the officers. It was only by the use of violence that the officer got the man to the police station where he was given a fine of $15. When arrested on traffic charges it is necessary that the man arrested sign his name to the summons or go to jail, the Chief decrees.

One local man took it upon himself to tell the department what the Lubbock people wanted in the way of law enforcement by claiming that the police were bearing down too hard on bootleggers and speeders. The police, the Chief pointed out, do not make the laws but enforce them, in keeping with their oaths of office, and as long as laws remain on the city statutes they will be upheld by his men, the Chief stated.

The A-J Remembers The Most Important People in Lubbock's History
 
 


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